I Want to Telecommute – How Can I Make it Happen?

By Alexandra Levit
Your career coach Alexandra Levit is an author and speaker focusing on workplace issues facing twenty-something employees. Learn more at www.alexandralevit.com.

In order to encourage better work/life balance, and as a response to technology that allows workers 24/7 accessibility, many organizations are implementing telecommuting policies. In fact, according to The Telework Coalition, more than 45 million U.S. workers currently telecommute from home at least once a week. Chuck Wilsker, president and CEO of the Coalition, recently told Payscale.com that he has seen a three-fold increase in the number of calls he fields from employers, employees and media wanting to know more about the reasons for telecommuting.

How can you make telecommuting work for you? Your first step is to talk with HR and/or read your orientation materials to understand how your organization’s flextime or telecommuting procedure works. Note that even if the company doesn’t have an official policy in place, if there are other people in your department who are already telecommuting, it shouldn't be unreasonable for you to hop on the bandwagon – provided you can honestly say you have the self-discipline to work productively without direct supervision.

In making an argument for telecommuting, prepare a written proposal that puts the company first and addresses, upfront, the issues you know your boss will be concerned about. For example, if you want to work from home one day per week, tell your boss that you plan to get more work done in less time due to the minimization of distractions and not having to commute. Explain how your home office will be set up and assure your manager that you will have a clean, quiet, child-free and supply-enabled work environment in which to complete your duties. Ask for a trial of the new arrangement, and prove the cost-savings by working much more efficiently on that home day than you do during your in-office days.

Once you have the green light, make sure that you are always accessible via e-mail/PDA and cell phone during the business day, and report project status often so it’s easy for your boss to keep tabs on you. And telecommuting full time shouldn’t mean that you never see the inside of your office building again. If you supervise other employees or occasionally make presentations about your initiatives, you should show up occasionally so that you can practice the most effective form of personal communication – in person. Don’t allow telecommuting to compromise the critical workplace relationships you’ve spent time and energy building.

Coaching and Mentoring Strategies for Success
Date: October 30, 2009
Time: 11:00 am – 12:00 pm (Eastern)
As a supervisor or manager, coaching and mentoring your staff is likely the most important part of your job. Understanding how to better communicate, motivate, and educate your team members is a daily responsibility. During this web seminar, we'll cover the basics of supervision from delegating to recognition; and accountability to discipline. You'll also take away practical examples currently being implemented and working within the agriculture industry to get the most out of your employees. Good leadership increases productivity, recruitment and retention with an organization. Don't miss your chance to gain a few ways to increase your effectiveness as a manager and register today!
Learn:
  • Appreciation for motivation and how to effectively motivate employees (specifically suggestions for ideas beyond increased compensation)
  • Styles of managers and identify your style and the strengths and weaknesses associated
  • Creating an accountable team and enforcing effective discipline when there is a lack of accountability
  • Communication and delegation techniques that help streamline and promote teamwork
  • The benefit to you, your organization, and your employees when effective coaching and mentoring strategies are in place
  • Register today – click here! For more information contact AgCareers.com at agcareers@agcareers.com

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