Vast Skill & Trade Opportunities in Agriculture
By AgCareers.com

An analysis of trends on AgCareers.com indicates there are significant skill and trade employment opportunities in the agriculture industry. AgCareers.com collects data on the education requirements requested by employers in their job postings. In more than 30% of posted jobs, employers indicated they desired a technical degree (skilled trade certificate or college/associates diploma). Nearly 20% of posted jobs required a high school diploma.

AgCareers.com classifies skill and trade careers as those that require a two-year degree or less. As indicated by figures above, more than half of all jobs posted are targeting those in this skill and trade career path. Job titles with these education requirements include ‘operations associate,’ ‘research assistant,’ ‘custom applicator,’ ‘maintenance supervisor,’ ‘supply technician,’ ‘accounting assistant,’ and many more.

Along with employers’ increasing needs for technically trained employees, the number of job seekers using AgCareers.com with high school or technical diplomas increased from 2009 to 2010. Job seekers with a high school diploma increased from 4% to 12% and technical/associates/skilled trade increased from 11% to 15% of the total.

AgCareers.com recognized these trends and launched the Skill & Trade Profession E-newsletter in 2010 in coordination with AgrowKnowledge. The email newsletter is targeted toward job seekers with high school or two-year degrees. The newsletter gives career advice and features jobs targeted to this education demographic. To subscribe to the monthly distribution of the Skill & Trade newsletter, click here.

Skill and trade careers can be found in almost all sectors of the agriculture industry, from biotechnology to equipment and machinery. AgCareers.com recently interviewed Jeff Flora, CEO, of the SouthWestern Association about careers in the equipment industry. For more information on the opportunities available, view the seven-minute video by clicking on the link below or visit the AgCareers.com YouTube channel.


© 2011 www.agcareers.com